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Abnormal functional connectivity within resting-state networks is related to rTMS-based therapy effects of treatment resistant depression: A pilot study

Abnormal functional connectivity within resting-state networks is related to rTMS-based therapy effects of treatment resistant depression: A pilot study

Authors: 
Ruiyang Ge, Daniel M. Blumberger, Jonathan Downar, Zafiris J. Daskalakis, Adam A. Dipinto, Joseph C.W. Tham, Raymond Lam, Fidel Vila-Rodriguez
Year: 
2017
Journal: 
Journal of Affective Disorders
Abstract: 

Background

Treatment resistant depression (TRD) remains a clinical challenge, and finding biomarkers that predict treatment response are a long sought goal to precisely indicate treatments. This pilot study aims to characterize brain dysfunction in TRD patients who underwent rTMS to define neuroimaging biomarkers that discriminate non-responders (NR) from responders (R).

Methods

20 TRD patients who underwent a course of rTMS to the left DLPFC were categorized into R and NR groups based on a >50% reduction in HRSD scores. Utilizing resting-state fMRI and ICA techniques, this study compared baseline RSNs of R vs. NR as well as TRD vs. healthy volunteer group. Regression analysis was conducted to link regions with clinical improvements. ROC analysis was further conducted to confirm the utility of the identified regions in classifying the patients.

Results

Prior to treatment, non-responders displayed hyper-connectivity in ACC/VMPFC, PCC/pC, dACC and insula within RSNs that have been associated with MDD pathology. Regression results showed that regions associated with clinical improvements overlapped largely with regions that showed aberrant connectivity. ACC/VMPFC, dACC and left insula, which are hub regions of DMN and SN, exhibited excellent performance (highest sensitivity=100% and highest specificity=82%) in discriminating the response status of the patients.

Limitations

Relatively small sample size.

Conclusions

Our findings provide insight into fMRI predictive measures of treatment response to rTMS treatment, and demonstrate the potential of RSNs-based biomarkers in predicting response to rTMS treatment. Future studies are needed to validate the application of these measures to inform individual treatment indications.

Read more: http://www.jad-journal.com/article/S0165-0327(16)32013-4/fulltext?cc=y=

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